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  • The New Haven Time Flip Clock

    The New Haven Time Flip Clock

    The New Haven Time Flip Clock It was the 1930s - The era of the Great Depression, when the New Haven Clock Company produced an early version of a true flip clock - the New Haven "Time Flip," "Time at a Glance" clock. The New Haven Clock Company operated out of New Haven, Connecticut from 1853-1960. Over the more than one century of its existance, the well known clock company produced many varieties of table, wall and mantle clocks, including elaborate chime clocks, and later, even pocket watches. During the 1930s masters of the arts, architecture and design were consumed with the Art Deco style, and the New Haven Clock Company produced its share of plastic (Catalin and Bakelite) Art Deco time pieces. Yet, they continued to produce the elegant, traditional clocks of wood, glass and brass. The New Haven "Time Flip" fit somewhere between the these two categories. Now referred to as the "New Haven Flip Clock," in online circles today this antique wooden flip clock is often described as Art Deco. Perhaps it would be better to say that the New Haven Flip Clocks were, "influenced" by the Art deco movement. Because compared to true Art Deco, these clocks do not quite fit the bill. In fact, when they first came out between 1937-1939 Art Deco had evolved to what is now called the Streamline Moderne style. Everything from cars, clocks, and tools were designed with streamlined profiles, and produced with modern materials in keeping with the engineering advances in aviation and train design. The designers were in tune with the public's fascination with world travel and streamlined speed. The New Haven flip clocks, while clearly different and unique, were not exactly the prevailing style, and yet did not fit completely in the traditional form either. So perhaps this explains why these clocks did not quite catch on and quickly faded into obscurity. This apparent lack of popularity in their time, and likely limited production, probably explains the rarity of the New Haven Flip Clock, which today makes them highly collectable and sought after by both traditional clock collectors (horologists) and aficionados of flip clocks (horopalettologists). This current popularity and scarcity certainly accounts for the high prices the clocks command at traditional and online auctions. Truly A Clock Ahead of it's time After production of the New Haven Flip Clocks, 30 years would pass before the modern flip clock era began. Anyone who appreciates the clean lines and simplicity of the Cifra 3 and the elegant functionality of the early Copals will clearly see the connection to the New Haven Flip Clocks of the late 1930s. To more appreciate this link to the past we need a little historical background. History of early flip clocksRecorded information from the makers of antique clocks from the 1930s is scarce or non-existant. No one thought to keep records of the details beyond patents. Today, these details must be pieced together from old advertisements of the day, established horological journals and online sources. The limited recorded history results in many being surprised to learn that there were already "digital" clocks in the 1930s when the New Haven flip clocks came on the scene. These were the cyclometers, the clocks that had digits that rolled on relatively large wheels housed in necessarily bulky cabinets. These type of clocks continued on into the 40s, 50s and 60s until overtaken by the flip clocks. Due to this lack of readily available information, even people in the 1960s had little idea of the history of digital clocks. This can be seen by an advertisement from that period that describes a flip clock of the day as the first new way to tell time in 10 centuries. Ah well, that was a time before the internet and instant knowledge. So basically, what we know about the New Haven "Time Flip" remains limited. The consensus is that the clocks first appeared in 1937. And by 1939 an advertisement still describes the clock as "modern masterpiece by New Haven that gives you the time accurately and precisely, just like you would speak it." Two Versions of the New Haven Timepiece (Stylis and Perseus) There exist two distinct versions of the New Haven Flip Clock. The slightly larger and more common style we will refer to here as the "Stylis" - from the paper label typically found on the bottom reading "Stylis Timepiece." The clock mechanism of the Stylis is housed in a cylindrical glass tube which seems to rest on an equally sized wooden framework or cradle. The cylinder and cradle are positioned between two arched, wooden end pieces on either side, almost like bookends. The numerals are large compared to cyclometers of the time and are easily visible from many paces away. The color of the tiles may have been ivory originally and the numbers brown, but there is no known way at this time to determine if these colors have faded or changed over the years. The movement of the motor can be confirmed by a spinning flat circle, flush with the right inner side of the clock, that looks like an umbrella pattern. The whole assembly lies on a relatively short (about 1/2 inch), flat wooden base. The wood is reportedly "natural Mohogany, trimmed with White Holly". Advertisements list the dimensions as 7 3/4 inches wide, 3 3/4 inches high and 3 3/4 inches deep. The "style number" (or model number?) stamped into a silver blank space on the painted metal idenfication plate reads "N.H.S 611-247T". Painted on this plate one can also see the various patent numbers and the identification of the clock as from the New Haven Clock CO. New Haven, CT. U.S.A. The second version of the New Haven flip clock, considerably more rare, is more akin to our 60s-70s flip clocks. The bottom label of these clocks describes this as the "Perseus Numeral Timepiece." Yet the name plate on the backs of these clocks contains the same style number (N.H.S 611-247T) as found on the "Stylis Timepiece". As a side note, it must be mentioned here that there is also another varient with the name plate bearing the stamp "WS-611-437T" with the name "Westinghouse Elect. Supply Co, Hamilton St, New Hanven, Ct. USA". This clock also has the "Perseus Numeral Timepiece" label on the bottom. Collectors who have had both types in their possession assert that they are identical. It has been speculated that the New Haven Clock Company produced these alternately marked clocks to be destributed by Westinghouse...
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  • The Copal Caslon 101 - Japan's first digital clock

    The Copal Caslon 101 - Japan's first digital clock

    The Copal Caslon 101 - Japan's first digital clock was introduced to the world in 1965 by the Copal Company, Ltd.

    Known as The Nidec Copal Corporation since 1998, the company began operation in 1946, with the production of photographic shutters which persist as one of the company's best-known products. The company remains a well established manufacturer of optical, electronic and mechanical equipment, still, primarily for the photographic industry.

    The designer of the Copal Calson 101 was the world renowned designer, Riki Wantanabe.

    Pioneer of Japanese design, Riki Wantanabe
    ジャパニーズデザインのパイオニア 渡辺力

    Riki Wantanabe 渡辺力 (1911 - 2013) was a distinguished Japanese industrial designer (often compared to the American designers Charles and Ray Eames) who passed away in 2013 at 101 years of age. Considered a pioneer of post-Second World War Japanese design in a time when the word or concept of "design" was little used in Japan, Wantanabe was initially made famous by furniture design. The Watanabe name eventually became established and well respected in the clock and watch design world.

    In 1964 Wantanabe designed the COPAL Caslon (キャスロン) 101. As described by Wantanabe, the clock is a leaf type table clock made by applying camera shutter and motor technology. A typeface called Caslon was used for the digits, from which the product derives it's model name. Wall hanging types of the Calson 101 were also produced.

    Riki Wantanabe later additionally designed the Calson 601 (1967) and the Copal Model C61 (1973).

    The Copal Caslon 101 - Shining Little Star This little sung superstar could be considered the flip clock from which the US flip clock proliferation of th...

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  • The Caslon 201 - Perhaps the first commercially successful flip clock in the US

    The Caslon 201 - Perhaps the first commercially successful flip clock in the US

    The Calson 201 by Copal Japan
    While advertisements for flip clocks and especially flip clock radios exploded between 1970 and 1975, there were almost none prior to the 70s. None except for this little, simple yet elegant flip clock called the Caslon 201.

    While there were other first tries (the Caslon 101) it was the model 201 that seems to have made the first appearance in newspapers as early as 1966! This was the same year that the famous Solari Udine Cifra 3 was released! This surprised me, as I didn't think the Japanese invasion of flip clocks happened until the 1970s.

    Now, it must be emphasized that technically, these were not the first flip clocks. Not counting the grandfather of flip clocks (the Plato Clock circa 1904) there existed at least two varieties of flip clocks around the 1950s with the Howard Miller name as well as a two wonderful art deco clocks from the late 1930s called the New Haven "Stylis Timepiece" and the "Perseus Numeral Timepiece" (pictured) - both curiously with the same model number: N.H.S 611-247T.



    Those new to flip clocks must ask themselves, so, what's the big deal then? The Solari Udine Cifra 3 caused much excitment when it was featured in the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) in New York, in the "Humble Masterpieces" collection, not long after it was released to the public. Some seem to get the impression that the Cifra 3 was the first flip clock, or the "Holy Grail of Flip Clocks" (whatever that means). In fact, some go so far as to claim it is the best clock design of all time. Perhaps, these are people trying to sell their Cifra 3. In any event, as we've already seen, it definitely was not the first flip clock. But maybe, as I believe, it was the one that spurred the modern flip clock craze of the 1970s. Specifically, it was around this time that the company Copal Japan mastered making the flip clock mechanisms and began producing the clocks that caught the attention of the US buying public. As we know, the vast majority of our flip clocks have Japanese Copal mechanisms.

    And that brings us right back to the Caslon 201. The clock was discussed in "The Horological Journal" (the journal of the British Horological Institute) in the April 1966 issue. A glowing Caslon 201 advertisement can also be found in the pages of the May 13, 1967 issue of "Science News" where it was introduced as "A different kind of time." (see below for image and text of this advertisement). Reading the newspaper advertisements of the day, you get the feel that is was a big deal and the next big thing. The late 60s was the beginning of the "Space Age" and often you'll see references to these flip clocks as "Excitingly Unique," "space age clocks" or "computer age clocks of tomorrow." It's funny now, because they had no idea that electronic digital would eclipse the flip clock by the 1980s. But looking at the sheer volume of ads for the Caslon 201 (and other models that followed) it is clear that the 1970s was the decade of the flip clock (and flip clock radios), and that the Caslon 201 seems to have lead the pack.

    Clock Details
    The clock was advertised as using Cyclolac for the body (billed as "same as used for telephone"). This is very durable and shatter resistant plastic. The clock face is real glass held in place by a real metal chrome bezel. The mechanism consists of white vinal tiles with black numbers run by a "Copal II" synchronous motor pushing gears housed in a sealed metal case. The clock is lit by a neon glow bulb and was said to glow in the dark "like a princess phone" (these telephones were a huge hit in the 50s and 60s due to their feature of lighting up). As already mentioned, it appeared in print ads in 1966 and then disappeared after 1973.

    Summary:
    It surprises me that there are not more of these clocks showing up on Etsy or Ebay. To me, it seems that they should be more abundant. Also I would think that they would be more desirable to collectors than other clocks. But that's where flip clockery didn't take that left turn at Albuquerque. People collect flip clocks for many varied reasons. Some collect clocks that have appears on TV or in the movies (guilty here), others seek out specific brands (Panasonic, Sony) and still others just want the clock that they had as a kid.

    But as far as flip clock history, I feel the Caslon 201 earned it's spot as the trail blazer in the US market. Not only does it deserve a spot on the shelf of any collector of clocks just because of its historical significance, it's just simply, one nice little flip clock!

    Advertisement from 1967:

    (text of the above ad follows)



    Video of the Review and Disassembly of the 201
    The Copal Caslon Model 201 Images above courtesy of RedRiverAntiques Advertisements: References: 1. The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, California), 11 Dec 1966, Sun, Page 72 [view ad] 2. The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, California), 19 Sep 1967, Tue, Page 36 [view ad] 3. Pasadena Independent (Pasadena, California), 05 Jun 1968, Wed, Page 3 [view ad] 4. The Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire), 03 Nov 1969, Mon, Page 23 [view ad] 5. Chicago Tribune (Chicago, Illinois), 09 Sep 1969, Tue, Page 15 [view ad] 6. Lansing State Journal (Lansing, Michigan), 06 Jul 1969, Sun, Page 106 [view ad] 7. Arizona Republic (Phoenix, Arizona), 22 Sep 1970, Tue, Page 3 [view ad] 8. San Antonio Express (San Antonio, Texas), 23 Dec 1970, Wed, Page 7 [view ad] 9. Arizona Republic (Phoenix, Arizona)31 Aug 1971, Tue, Page 10 [view ad] 10. Arizona Daily Star (Tucson, Arizona), 09 Jan 1973, Tue, Page 30 [view ad] See forum entry to comment ...
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  • The Coca Cola Flip Clock Sign

    The Coca Cola Flip Clock Sign

    The Coca Cola Flip Clock Sign - It's the Real Thing!
    Produced sometime between 1969 and 1973 (see "Manufacturing Details" below for how we came to this best guess), the Coca Cola flip clock sign features an over-sized, white Caslon flip clock set within translucent, cola brown plastic and prominently featuring an iconic red Coca Cola square logo.

    The clock was originally an integral part of a larger display. This particular clock was discovered on eBay and had numerous cracks and showed signs of attempts to make the clock more free-standing by sawing off plastic components from the right side of the clock.

    Restoration: FlipClockFans.com administrator finished removal of the extra, now unnecessary and somewhat unsightly portions of the display. The semitransparent brown plastic accepted sanding and polishing well, but curiously, any sanding or polishing seemed to create a substantial amount of heat very quickly. Sawing the plastic was tricky as the developing heat caused plastic material to melt away more than being removed by abrasion. With much manual work the clock was eventually taken to a very pleasing shape, resulting in a unique clock that displays very well.

    Manufacturing Details (Date of Manufacture): The Coca Cola Flip Clock Sign was manufactured by the Display Corporation International which is now known as DCI Marketing. This company's name changed to DCI Marketing, Inc. in August 1984 which quickly helps establish the latest date possible for manufacture of this item. The clock mechanism was provided by Ropat-Caslon Inc as indicated by a label present on the mechanism (not visible from the outside of the clock). While Caslon clocks were produced as early as 1966, the Ropat-Caslon Inc company was incorporated under this name on March 20, 1969. Which establishes the earliest possible creation date for this Coca Cola flip clock sign....
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  • Molson Beer Sign Flip Clock

    Molson Beer Sign Flip Clock

    The Molson Beer Sign Flip Clock - Very rarely seen, the Molson Beer Sign Flip clock holds interest for both those interested in breweriana as well as flip clock fans. The sign was designed and producted by Display Corporation, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. This company is still in business and known as DCI Marketing, Inc. What is now known as Molson Coors Brewing Company, brewers of both Molson brands and Coors, is historically linked to Canada's oldest beer brewery founded on the banks of the St. Lawrence River in Montreal. Molson Canadian was first brewed in 1959 and remains one of Canada’s most iconic and best-selling brands. The ship logo present on the clock represents Molson Export Ale and is still in use today. Dimensions: 12 inches high, 10 inches at widest point and approximately 4 inches deep. Power: rated for 117 volts at 60Hz, the clock/sign reportedly uses 18 watts Lighting: It uses one 4 Watt 6" Cool White T5 Mini-Bipin Base Fluorescent Bulb (C/O PH 249631 / F4T5/CW) that is readily available online and very inexpensive (about a buck). Clock Mechanism The white flip cards display time in 24 hour format and are fairly large, much larger than a standard flip clock, measuring approximately 1.5 inches wide and the two cards together making each digit 1.5 inches tall. The clock closely resembles the early Copal Clocks actually using the exact motor and gear box used in the Caslon 201. Personal History with this clock The clock/sign was purchased through eBay from a Canadian seller on March 13,2017 and with shipping the clock went for just over $105.00 (including shipping). Yes, very pricey, but the clock was rare and to this day I have not seen another. Unfortunately, the seller was horrible when it came to packaging. The clock arived in multiple pieces. Primarily the casing was shattered. When I complained, we were able to come to a reasonable price adjustment. I was probably more generous than I should have been, but ultimately the clock/sign cost me about $50.00. The case had to be epoxied to get it to a usable condition. Unfortunately, for some unknown reason the clock motor when out with a loud pop and a spark, apparently shorting out inside the windings. The clock then spent almost 4 months in solitary confinement in a cardboard box. In early July 2017 while working with a Copal Caslon 201 the similarity of the motors of the clock and the sign/clock became apparent. As we had a Calson 201 for parts in the FlipClockFans collection, the sign/clock was released from captivity. The rest is history. We now have a working Molson Beer Sign Flip Clock. Impressions: The clock is quite impressive on the wall, especially at night. You might think that the orange portion is glass, but it's not. It's just thin sign plastic. These are not sturdily built (as my experience detailed above and in the video below can attest). While I don't think I'll branch off into flip clock signs, they remain an interest to me. This particular clock looks great on the wall and adds light as well as displaying the time, keeping very good time after all these years. ...
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    Last edited by Mackey; July 8th, 2017, 01:30 PM.

  • Caslon 201

    Caslon 201

    Clock Name: Caslon 201 Common Name: The Caslon Digital Electric Desk Clock Brand: Caslon Model Number: 201 Type: Digital Clock Manufacturer: Copal Country of Manufature: Japan Year of release: 1966 (seen in print advertising from 1966-1973) Imported by: Ropat, Box 2662, Culver City, CA. photo credit You are viewing a entry in the Flip Clock Catalogue - An ongoing effort to provide details about flip clocks gathered from internet sources and personal experience. Your comments at the end of this article can add valuable information to this catalogue. Power Source: AC 120V 60Hz Measures: - enter here - Lighting: Neon glow lamp. Colors: White, Black, Brown, Dark Gray, Red, Blue. Features: 12 or 24 hour versions, nylon gears, Cyclolac case (billed as "same as used for telephone"), "soft lighting." This clock is one of the first marketed in the United States. Qualities: very sturdy case, know to work for years without service Problems: front is glass - can break if dropped. Restoration Tips:- enter here - Forum Entries/Other Onsite Info: photo gallery Advertisements: References: 1. The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, California), 11 Dec 1966, Sun, Page 72 [view ad] 2. The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, California), 19 Sep 1967, Tue, Page 36 [view ad] 3. Pasadena Independent (Pasadena, California), 05 Jun 1968, Wed, Page 3 [view ad] 4. The Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire), 03 Nov 1969, Mon, Page 23 [view ad] 5. Chicago Tribune (Chicago, Illinois), 09 Sep 1969, Tue, Page 15 [view ad] 6. Lansing State Journal (Lansing, Michigan), 06 Jul 1969, Sun, Page 106 [view ad] 7. Arizona Republic (Phoenix, Arizona), 22 Sep 1970, Tue, Page 3 [view ad] 8. San Antonio Express (San Antonio, Texas), 23 Dec 1970, Wed, Page 7 [view ad] 9. Arizona Republic (Phoenix, Arizona)31 Aug 1971, Tue, Page 10 [view ad] 10. Arizona Daily Star (Tucson, Arizona), 09 Jan 1973, Tue, Page 30 [view ad] Contributors: Mackey Credits: photo by RedRiverAntiques used with permission NOTES Do you have corrected/updated or more information about this clock? If so please leave a comment below. Your comment will be review and may become a part of this data sheet. You do not need to be a member to comment. However, only Members will receive credit under "Contributors" above. Not a member? Why not join? It's fast, easy and free Join Today! Return to the Flip Clock Catalogue...
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    Last edited by Mackey; May 26th, 2017, 11:10 PM.

  • Panasonic RC-6003

    Panasonic RC-6003

    Clock Name: Panasonic RC-6003 Digital Clock Radio - The Vernon Common Name: The No Country for Old Men Flip Clock Brand: Panasonic Model Number: RC-6003 Type: Flip Clock FM-AM Clock Radio Alarm Manufacturer: Matsushita Electrical Industrial Co., LTD (Panasonic) Country of Manufacture: Japan Year of release: 1973 (in print ads up to 1976) photo credit You are viewing a entry in the Flip Clock Catalogue - An ongoing effort to provide details about flip clocks gathered from internet sources and personal experience. Your comments at the end of this article can add valuable information to this catalogue. Power Source: AC 120V 60Hz 5W Measures: - enter here - Lighting: incandescent bulb Colors: white (aka pearl white or antique white), beige (aka tan, harvest gold) Features:FM-AM Radio, built in FM/AM antennas, music or buzzer alarm wake up, 60-minute sleep time with automatic shut-off, Full feature 24-hour digital clock, Once-only awake set, lighted dial clock face, solid state engineered, 3" PM dynamic speaker, Comes in antique white or beige. Qualities: Very durable plastics, very good sound quality. Problems: Plastic face plate is often sealed to the cabinet with heat (melting plastic tabs) making removal very difficult and perhaps unwise. While not technically a problem, digital cameras have rendered the beige (or "autumn gold") colored clock as almost a banana yellow. Restoration Tips: Relatively easy to disassemble. If clock is not flipping, the motor probably needs to be cleaned. Forum Entries/Other Onsite Info: photo gallery The Elementary Flip Clock Advertisements: References: 1. Battle Creek Enquirer, (Battle Creek, Michigan), 02 Nov 1973, Fri • Other Editions • Page 1 2. Fond Du Lac Commonwealth Reporter, (Fond Du Lac, Wisconsin), 10 Dec 1973, Mon • Page 8 3. The Salem News, (Salem, Ohio), 20 Dec 1973, Thu • Page 15 4. The Ithaca Journal, (Ithaca, New York), 19 Dec 1974, Thu • Page 11 5. Wilmington News-Journal, (Wilmington, Ohio), 03 Sep 1975, Wed • Page 2 6. Marshfield News-Herald, (Marshfield, Wisconsin), 27 Oct 1976, Wed • Page 9 Contributors: Mackey Credits: photo used with permission - name withheld NOTES Do you have corrected/updated or more information about this clock? If so please leave a comment below. Your comment will be review and may become a part of this data sheet. You do not need to be a member to comment. However, only Members will receive credit under "Contributors" above. Not a member? Why not join? It's fast, easy and free Join Today! Return to the Flip Clock Catalogue...
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  • Panasonic RC-7053

    Panasonic RC-7053

    Clock Name: Panasonic RC-7053 Common Name: The Ellsworth Brand: Panasonic Model Number: RC-7053 Type: FM/AM day-digital clock radio flip clock Manufacturer: Matsushita Electrical Industrial Co. Ltd. (Panasonic) Country of Manufacture: Japan Year of release: 1973 (seen in print ads from 1973-1976) photo credit You are viewing a entry in the Flip Clock Catalogue - An ongoing effort to provide details about flip clocks gathered from internet sources and personal experience. Your comments at the end of this article can add valuable information to this catalogue. Power Source: AC 120V 60Hz 10W Measures: - enter here - Lighting: 120V neon glow bulbs (2) Colors: plastic wood grain top, wood laminate sides, brushed aluminum accents Features: Day of week, earphone, optional pillow speaker, external FM antenna attachments Qualities: sturdy construction, real wood sides, real metal accents, durable, long lasting internal components. Problems: wood laminate can chip, clock motor prone to seizing after prolonged storage (easily fixed), neon bulbs will need replacing. Restoration Tips: many screws screw into plastic - do not torque down too hard, disassembly easy, to remove clock mechanism you will have to remove smaller pcb from base and remove wires to light bulbs. Forum Entries/Other Onsite Info: photo gallery - Panasonic RC-7053 Advertisements: References: 1. The Herald Citizen Tri-County Shopper, (Woodstock, Illinois), 08 Nov 1973, Thu • Page 52 2. Waukesha Daily Freeman, (Waukesha, Wisconsin), 13 Dec 1973, Thu • Page 17 3. The News Leader, (Staunton, Virginia), 20 Jun 1973, Wed • Page 9 4. The Sheboygan Press, (Sheboygan, Wisconsin), 14 Aug 1974, Wed • Page 26 5. Longview News-Journal, (Longview, Texas), 21 Dec 1974, Sat • Page 18 6. Longview News-Journal, (Longview, Texas), 12 Dec 1974, Thu • Main Edition • Page 31 Contributors: Mackey Credits: photo by Mackey NOTES Do you have corrected/updated or more information about this clock? If so please leave a comment below. Your comment will be review and may become a part of this data sheet. You do not need to be a member to comment. However, only Members will receive credit under "Contributors" above. Not a member? Why not join? It's fast, easy and free Join Today! Return to the Flip Clock Catalogue...
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    Last edited by Mackey; June 2nd, 2017, 08:57 AM.

  • Panasonic RC-6025

    Clock Name: Panasonic AM/FM Digital Clock Alarm Radio Common Name: The Groundhog Day Flip Clock Brand: Panasonic Model Number: RC-6025 Type: flip clock, alarm, radio Manufacturer: Matsushita Electric Ind. Co., Ltd. Country of Manufature: Japan Year of release: 1976 photo credit You are viewing a entry in the Flip Clock Catalogue - An ongoing effort to provide details about flip clocks gathered from internet sources and personal experience.Your comments at the end of this article can add valuable information to this catalogue. Power Source: AC 120V 60Hz 5W Measures: - enter here - Lighting: - enter here - Colors: white Features: flip digits, decent quality AM/FM reception. Qualities: Plastics relatively sturdy Problems: - Light on digits last no longer than 5 years. - clock face prone to scratching. Restoration Tips: Case will almost always be discolored/yellowed - can be fixed with hydrogen peroxide treatment (more details to follow).. Forum Entries/Other Onsite Info: photo gallery Advertisements:    References: Newpaper clippings above from Newspapers.com. Contributors: Mackey Credits: photo by Mackey NOTES Do you have corrected/updated or more information about this clock? If so please leave a comment below. Your comment will be review and may become a part of this data sheet. You do not need to be a member to comment. However, only Members will receive credit under "Contributors" above. Not a member? Why not join? It's fast, easy and free Join Today! Return to the Flip Clock Catalogue...
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  • The SONY SOLID STATE Portable DIGIMATIC TELEVISION

    The SONY SOLID STATE Portable DIGIMATIC TELEVISION

    Something Unique for your pleasure
    The SONY SOLID STATE Portable DIGIMATIC TELEVISION

    Featuring
    - Loop antenna for UHF, earphone
    - Automatic TV ON/OFF (sleep switch) 14 hour alarm
    - DIGITAL CLOCK
    - Snap IN/OUT Smoke Filter
    - Wood Cabinet

    An Impressive Gift .... and ...
    It can be yours if you shop on Etsy.com

    The Sony Digimatic Television with Digital Clock (Model number TVC-111U) made an appearance as early as 1969 as can be seen from an advertisement from The Los Angeles Times (27 Nov 1969 page 374).

    This fine TV was spotted on Etsy.com by FlipClockFans.com member Ryan W. And due to the kindness of Etsy Shop Owner, DaisyMaude, here you can see images of this unique TV. If you hurry ... the TV could also be yours, as it's reasonably priced at $109.53. (check out the listing)



    An advertisement from 1970 in the Delaware County Daily Times listed the clock for sale for $149.95.
    $149.95 in 1970 had the same buying power as $960.28 in 2017 from dollartimes.com

    The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, California) 27 Nov 1969, Thu • Page 374 Delaware County Daily Times (Chester, Pennsylvania) 25 Sep 1970, Fri • Page 11
    ...
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