Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Articles

Collapse

Latest Articles

Collapse

Topics Statistics Last Post
Started by Mackey, December 30th, 2017, 02:22 AM
0 responses
46 views
0 likes
Last Post Mackey
by Mackey
 
Started by Mackey, December 25th, 2017, 02:30 AM
0 responses
54 views
1 like
Last Post Mackey
by Mackey
 
Started by Mackey, December 23rd, 2017, 10:07 PM
0 responses
89 views
1 like
Last Post Mackey
by Mackey
 
Started by Mackey, December 20th, 2017, 08:29 PM
0 responses
91 views
0 likes
Last Post Mackey
by Mackey
 
Started by Mackey, December 12th, 2017, 10:31 PM
0 responses
34 views
0 likes
Last Post Mackey
by Mackey
 
Started by Mackey, December 6th, 2017, 01:36 AM
0 responses
32 views
0 likes
Last Post Mackey
by Mackey
 
Started by Mackey, November 20th, 2017, 02:24 AM
0 responses
35 views
0 likes
Last Post Mackey
by Mackey
 
Started by Mackey, September 4th, 2017, 11:40 AM
0 responses
202 views
0 likes
Last Post Mackey
by Mackey
 
Started by Mackey, August 13th, 2017, 09:19 PM
0 responses
426 views
0 likes
Last Post Mackey
by Mackey
 
Started by Mackey, July 14th, 2017, 12:04 AM
0 responses
145 views
0 likes
Last Post Mackey
by Mackey
 
Started by Mackey, July 8th, 2017, 01:46 PM
0 responses
98 views
0 likes
Last Post Mackey
by Mackey
 
Started by Mackey, June 5th, 2017, 12:37 AM
0 responses
420 views
0 likes
Last Post Mackey
by Mackey
 

CMS Home Page

  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How To Make A Custom LED Module for the Panasonic RC-7462 - The Black Lighted Clock.

    How To Make A Custom LED Module for the Panasonic RC-7462 - The Black Lighted Clock.

    Update: 12/23/2017 - There is a better way now.
    See this post for details.

    Creating a Custom LED Module for the Panasonic RC-7462
    Panasonic RC-6472 Black Lighted Flip ClockThe Panasonic RC-7462 features twin, AM/FM speedometer-like FM/AM tuning dials, a fine sounding 4 inch speaker (for a vintage flip clock), real wood side panels and a relatively large flip clock mechanism with fluorescent digits. The clock originally came with a 3 inch black light tube that reportedly (per a magazine advertisement) provided "sharp and clear" illumination without glaring light. However, finding this clock with a working blacklight is not likely in this era. The two clocks used in a recent restoration by flipclockfans.com both had tubes with some purple glow left, but not enough to even lightly illuminate the digits of the flip clock.

    Initially trying a blacklight 6 LED 42 mm festoon bulb in a restored RC-7462 produced adequate results, but the bulb did not fully illuminate the digits. Also, when wired into the 12 volts provided by the circuit board, the light would pulsate when music was played moderately to loudly.

    The Solution:
    Devise a custom LED module with as few LEDs as possible, wired in parallel to the circuit board.

    How To Make Your Own Custom LED Module (Black Light!)

    Materials needed
    4 - 5mm UV/Purple Ultra Bright Round Top LEDs
    (wavelength of around 400nm or less) - try lighthouseleds.com
    4 - 470 Ohm 1/4 (0.25) Watt Resistors (metal film recommended).
    Ours purchased from eBay seller "Oddwires"
    1 - Cord Channel (for hiding and organizing an electric cord)
    rounded, flat bottomed with no more than a 1/2 inch diameter
    4 - 10 inch lengths of twisted pair 24 AWG stranded wire (or 4 lengths of two
    different colors of wire to differentiate between + and -
    (we went overboard with Thermax - Teflon insulated, silver-plated 19 stranded copper wire).
    1 - 3/16 inch drill bit (and drill if needed)
    1 - razor blade/utility knife
    1 - wire stripper tool of your choice
    1 - soldiering iron and soldier
    1 - ruler
    1 - tape measure
    1 - cutting device (hacksaw, or Dremel with cutting wheel).





    The Materials - Easily available from various internet and hardware sources



    Part One: The Module Housing - cut a 3 inch length of the cord channel with your saw, Dremel or other tool. - drill holes to accept the LEDS: To obtain the correct angle of lighting, you need to measure 1/2 inch from the top of the wire channel on what will be the back of our module or, 1/2 inch from the base at the front (right where the flat spot ends). You'll need to wrap a tape measure right up against the cord channel to get a proper and consistent measure. This alignment was obtained from much trial and error and using a prototype. If your cord channel is not the same as that listed/pictured, you will almost certainly have to alter this measurement. Mark the 1/2 in off at a few spots and connect the dots with pencil using a straight edge - Mark off the four points where you will drill your holes for the LEDS: Again, the following measures were developed for these particular LEDs after many trials. With the front facing you (the part opposite the open channel), mark off points from left to right as follows: 5/8 in, 1 1/4 in, 2 in and 2 1/4 inch. The initial 5/8 inch mark works because the module will be butted up against the available space in the cabinet, 5/8 inches over being the optimal spot to illuminate the last minute digit and correctly align the ...
    See more | Go to post

  • Copal Model 702

    Copal Model 702

    The Copal Model 702 - Flip clock alarm featuring glass front and bronze or gold anodized aluminum wrap around case. The clock can be found in print advertising from 1973 and was priced from $16.99 to $25.95 with a manufactures suggested retail price of $34.95. The clock could be found on the shelves around the time the Copal Model 222 was available. Because the case is entirely aluminum and glass, it feels heavy in the hand although it only weighs in at about 1.8 lbs. The white on black digits are well lighted by an orange neon glow bulb. The clock feaures a piezoelectric alarm with the standard loud buzzing alarm and a snooze button (lasting only from 3-5 minutes). The clock alarm on/off switch is found on the back of the clock. The clock stands out among flip clocks of the day due to it's seconds wheel. These were not uncommon in the rolling wheel (cyclometer) clocks, but not often found in later flip clocks. The Copal Model 702 is closely related to the black lighted, wider model 705L with clock mechanism essentially identical except for the 705L possessing the fluoresent green digits. The 705L had to be wider to accomodate an extra transformer that served to supply power to the black light, this of course being abscent in the 702, allowing it to be only 7 inches wide compared to the 8 1/2 wide model 705L. Advertisement: The Ithaca Journal Thu Nov 22 1973 pg 28 More Details Dimensions: 7 inches wide, 3 1/2 inches high, 4 1/2 inches deep. Weight: 1.8 lbs Made in Japan To comment and see a video of the disassembly - see the forum post...
    See more | Go to post

  • Caslon MiniMod Digital Clock - De-Yellowing a Vintage Flip Clock

    Caslon MiniMod Digital Clock - De-Yellowing a Vintage Flip Clock

    Caslon MiniMod Digital Clock First seen in advertising November 15, 1972 the Calson MiniMod was priced from $7.88 to $11.99 (equivalent to $46.29 to $70.43 in 2017 dollars). By 1973 you could find the clock priced at $5.99 ($34.03 in 2017) The Caslon MiniMod has no other features besides the flip clock. The clock's advertised dimensions are 5 1/4 inches wide, 3 3/4 inches tall and 3 1/4 inches deep. This is close enough to the actual measures, but the clock's shape does not lend itself to being easily measured. It's an unusually small flip clock with unusual styling, the retangular clock face cradled by a semi-oval shaped case resting on a base that looks like a trophy stand. It sits high enough up on this stand that you could wrap the cord around it (I saw that on eBay once ... please don't do that). The front of the clock face is real glass and the font face of the white on black digits is compressed, but with thick lines; kind of angular and otherwise without much flair. It seems somewhat quirky, not really representative of typical fonts of the period, and not really easy to read. Unfortunately, this particular formerly "frosty white" flip clock had become very, very yellowed over the approximately 45 years of it's existence. Turning a plastic banana clock back to it's former glory. Whitening flip clocks was not commonly discussed until about 2013. But "De-yellowing" plastic has been around at least since 2009 (this being performed by collectors of vintage computers among other things). Before this, people had assumed that the plastic had become permanently yellowed due to age. In this Google driven world of free information you'll find several alternatives for de-yellowing plastic. But FlipClockFans rule number two of FlipClockery states: Use the simplest and cheapest method! All you'll need is some light, and a bottle of the stuff people use to bleach their hair (hydrogen peroxide containing creme developer). After disassembly, the Caslon flip clock was placed in a bowl then coated in Salon Care 50 Volume Creme Developer. Typically only licensed hair care professionals can get a strength up to 50 (us lowly consumers can only purchase 40 volume). I have to confess that I have access to a licensed professional who supplied me with my stuff. The 40 probably would work just as good, I'm sure. In any event, after coating the surfaces of the yellowed plastic generously in the hydrogen peroxide containing gel, I covered the bowl with plastic wrap (to decrease evaporation) and irradiated it with bulbs on my desk. Later, I moved the operation to my garage and finished the process with a halogen shop lamp. No more than 72 hours after starting, the yellowing disappeared. What causes plastics to yellow in the first place? UV light reacts with what are called brominated (bromine containing) flame retardants that have been added to plastics. This reaction liberates bromine allowing it to bond to oxygen. Oxides of bromine have a yellow to yellow-orange color and these products remain bound within the matrix of the outer surface of the plastic, giving us the aged, yellow look. When hydrogen peroxide reacts with these molecules, the bromine oxides are converted to hydrogen bromide which is colorless. It is asserted by many that the action of the hydrogen peroxide is enhanced by UV light (the cause becomes part of the solution). While I used to question the need for UV light, my experience tends to support the use of UV light. In the case of this MiniMod Clock, I started the reaction by using two household LED bulbs. They are broad spectrum and actually do have some light in the UV spectrum. When I switched over the halogen shop light, I noticed a significant increase in the speed of the process. Halogen lights are known to have significantly more UV light in their spectrum. So now this little piece of flip clock history has joined the other early flip clocks in FlipClockFans studios. Video detailing the disassembly and the de-yellowing process ...
    See more | Go to post

  • Replacing the Bulb in Black Lighted Flip Clocks

    Replacing the Bulb in Black Lighted Flip Clocks

    I'm thrilled to announce that I believe we've found a fantastic solution to the problem of trying to replace the blacklight in certain models of flip clocks (Panasonic RC-7264 and the Copal Model 705L for example). With Surface Mount Technology, continued improvements in LED technology and the development of "LED Drivers" (AC to DC transformers) specifically designed for LEDs, we've now reached a point that replacing the blacklight in flip clocks is economical while delivering great results. If you're wondering, yes, I am excited about this. For a reasonable cost (including shipping) of under $20.00 I was able to replace the blacklight in my Copal 705L. (see the parts list at bottom). The "contant current driver" provides just the right amout of steady 12V DC to power the strip of LEDs cut from a length of the weatherproof 12V LED Tape Light. These things are amazing. A length of this tape (you can buy multiples of this for other applications) has 30 LEDs. You can actually cut this tape every third LED (the tape is well marked). It was nice that the length shipped to FlipClockFans Studeos already had the leads soldiered to the tape. A 3 LED piece provides plenty of evenly spaced black light to make the Copal 705L look like it did back in the day! The LED driver is an inch and 1/2 square about 3/4 inch deep. A 3 LED length of tape measures 2 inches. It's very convenient the the tape comes with peel-and-stick adhesive backing. I was able to press the tape right into the well that held the vintage black light bulb. Parts List (Superbrightleds.com) LD-CU3512-01: 350mA Constant Current LED Driver - 1 Watt LED Driver $5.95 SWFLS-UV30-WHT: Outdoor LED Strip Lights - Weatherproof 12V LED Tape Light Side Emittin - 59 Lumens/ft - UV-BlackLight $11.95 After 15% promotional discount and shipping, total cost: $18.70 To comment and see a video of the process see the forum post...
    See more | Go to post

  • The Copal Model 705L

    The Copal Model 705L

    The Copal Model 705L - a black light flip clock alarm with an anodized aluminum wrap around case, plastic end pieces and knobs. Availability: The clock comes up on the auction sites very rarely but when you see it, it will get your attention. Sellers on eBay have been noted to indicate that it may be made of copper or bronze, but a little research, testing and observation at FlipClockFans studios clearly shows this clock to be bronze electrolytic colorized anodized aluminum. Features: The clock features fluorescent green digits on black background illuminated by a black light bulb. bulb used is the NL80T8B. This is the exact bulb used in the Panasonic RC-7462, another period black light clock. Unfortunately, by this time after it's manufacture, the black light bulb is very weak, barely causing the digits to glow. Impressions: The clock is sleek and classy. You'll immediately notice its shimmer. Picking it up you will realize that the clock is substantial and solid. However, it only weighs in at 2 lbs 5 oz. As with all early copal clocks, the clock is a quiet flipper with a racous buzzing alarm. The Copal 705L in Advertising: In Advertising the clock is noted to appear in a newspaper ad in 1974, alongside the Copal 222, 227 and 229 . These clocks at the time were priced between $15-25 dollars. The Copal 705L was nearly double this at about $45.00. Clearly it was a higher end clock attempting to appeal to the higher income crowd. The clock was described as "Copal 705L Digital Alarm Clock with 'Black Light'. " Details: Model: Copal 705L Dimensions: 8 3/4 wide, 3 1/2 inches tall, 4 1/4 inches deep. Weight: 2.3 lbs (1.04 kg) Features: 5 min snooze button on top of the clock, alarm on/off switch on back. Type: 12 - hour and 24 - hour Power: 115 V AC, 60 Hz, 6 Watts and 180-260V AC 50 Hz 6 Watts. Color: Bronze Case Material:Electrolytic Colorized Anodized Aluminum Flip Clock: fluorescent green digits on black background Lighting: black light using NL80T8B bulb Manfactured in Japan Sold in US: 1974 Price in 1974: $49.95 $49.95 in 1974 had the same buying power as $261.03 in 2017 from dollartimes. com Advertisement from: The Kane Republican Kane, Pennsylvania February 15, 1974 pg 6 To comment on this article or clock and to see a video of the disassembly, go to the forum post...
    See more | Go to post

  • The Elgin Cylinder Clock

    The Elgin Cylinder Clock

    The Elgin Drum Clock or Cylinder Clock surely catches the eye for it's very unusual time keeping method. This vintage, space age clock uses stacked wheels to tell the hours, minutes and alarm setting which are housed in a clear plastic cylinder (or drum-shaped) housing. While the Elgin name can be found on numerous clocks including desk and wall clocks, these are not associated with the Elgin Watch Company (also known as Elgin National Watch Company) which operated out of Elgin, Illinois from 1864 to 1968. Online sources assert that wall and other clocks with the Elgin name are not associated with the famous American Watch company and clocks with this name started appearing after the company closed its doors in 1968. Determining the actual manufacturer or distributor of these clock is difficult, but it was clearly made in Japan (as indicated on the bottom of the clock). The date of manufacture is likewise difficult with some online sellers asserting the clock dates from the 1950s to 1960s. As discussed above, this is unlikely as the makers could not have used the Elgin name until after 1968. The clock fits with the space aged themes of the late 60s and early 70s so this is when we are speculating the clocks were produced. Reading the time is accomplished by observing the hour appearing behind the red line that runs the length of the clear plastic cylinder, then glancing up to the minutes wheel to determine the minutes. Setting the clock is accomplished by a brass knob on the bottom that when turned counterclockwise (as indicated by the arrow etched on the bottom) causes the top (minutes) and middle (hour) wheels to spin. In the same way, the knob closer to the outter area of the clock bottom sets the desired hour of awakening, by lining the time with the red indicator. To be brutally honest, this clock is horrible if you're needing to determine time quickly, or from a distance. Setting a specific time to rise is likewise difficult and it is suspected that often the alarm function and/or the time gets knocked out of alignment with handling or dropping. Yet, it can't be denied that the clock is high on the cool retro scale, and it's almost certain any collector of flip clocks could find a spot for this clock on their shelf. Clock Details Description: Cylinder or can shaped clock with three circular dials indicating, from the top down, minutes, hour, alarm set time. Colors are brown (base) black and bronze (numbers and outline of numbers) with a gold brushed aluminum top with an...
    See more | Go to post

  • The Sunbeam Beer Barrel Alarm Flip Clock

    The Sunbeam Beer Barrel Alarm Flip Clock

    The Sunbeam Beer Barrel Alarm Flip Clock The Beer Barrel flip clock, evidently model (catalogue number) 85-115 is a bit of a mystery. You won't find many (or any online) and it comes with no explanation. It's just a flip clock .... that looks like a tapped wooden beer barrel. The clock is an alarm flip clock and by the looks of the internals, was a relatively early flip clock (due to the presence of a neon glow bulb. What can you say? It's designed well - it looks like what it's supposed to be. Disassembly reveals a plastic clock that is sturdy, quiet and keeps time well. This is one of those clocks that we'll be hoping someone gives us more information about in the future. Clock Details (from the label) Name: Sunbeam Electric Clock Model: Cat. No. 85-115 Power: 120 Volts AC 60Hz 4 watts Other: Service Number SN85-11G Manufacturer: Sunbeam Corporation Chicago ILL Made in Japan See the Forum Post for a video of the clock and to comment....
    See more | Go to post

  • The Caslon 201 - Perhaps the first commercially successful flip clock in the US

    The Caslon 201 - Perhaps the first commercially successful flip clock in the US

    The Calson 201 by Copal Japan
    While advertisements for flip clocks and especially flip clock radios exploded between 1970 and 1975, there were almost none prior to the 70s. None except for this little, simple yet elegant flip clock called the Caslon 201.

    While there were other first tries (the Caslon 101) it was the model 201 that seems to have made the first appearance in newspapers as early as 1966! This was the same year that the famous Solari Udine Cifra 3 was released! This surprised me, as I didn't think the Japanese invasion of flip clocks happened until the 1970s.

    Now, it must be emphasized that technically, these were not the first flip clocks. Not counting the grandfather of flip clocks (the Plato Clock circa 1904) there existed at least two varieties of flip clocks around the 1950s with the Howard Miller name as well as a two wonderful art deco clocks from the late 1930s called the New Haven "Stylis Timepiece" and the "Perseus Numeral Timepiece" (pictured) - both curiously with the same model number: N.H.S 611-247T.



    Those new to flip clocks must ask themselves, so, what's the big deal then? The Solari Udine Cifra 3 caused much excitment when it was featured in the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) in New York, in the "Humble Masterpieces" collection, not long after it was released to the public. Some seem to get the impression that the Cifra 3 was the first flip clock, or the "Holy Grail of Flip Clocks" (whatever that means). In fact, some go so far as to claim it is the best clock design of all time. Perhaps, these are people trying to sell their Cifra 3. In any event, as we've already seen, it definitely was not the first flip clock. But maybe, as I believe, it was the one that spurred the modern flip clock craze of the 1970s. Specifically, it was around this time that the company Copal Japan mastered making the flip clock mechanisms and began producing the clocks that caught the attention of the US buying public. As we know, the vast majority of our flip clocks have Japanese Copal mechanisms.

    And that brings us right back to the Caslon 201. The clock was discussed in "The Horological Journal" (the journal of the British Horological Institute) in the April 1966 issue. A glowing Caslon 201 advertisement can also be found in the pages of the May 13, 1967 issue of "Science News" where it was introduced as "A different kind of time." (see below for image and text of this advertisement). Reading the newspaper advertisements of the day, you get the feel that is was a big deal and the next big thing. The late 60s was the beginning of the "Space Age" and often you'll see references to these flip clocks as "Excitingly Unique," "space age clocks" or "computer age clocks of tomorrow." It's funny now, because they had no idea that electronic digital would eclipse the flip clock by the 1980s. But looking at the sheer volume of ads for the Caslon 201 (and other models that followed) it is clear that the 1970s was the decade of the flip clock (and flip clock radios), and that the Caslon 201 seems to have led the pack.

    Clock Details
    The clock was advertised as using Cyclolac for the body (billed as "same as used for telephones”). This is very durable and shatter resistant plastic. The clock face is real glass held in place by a real metal chrome bezel. The mechanism consists of white vinal tiles with black numbers run by a "Copal II" synchronous motor pushing gears housed in a sealed metal case. The clock is lit by a neon glow bulb and was said to glow in the dark "like a princess phone" (these telephones were a huge hit in the 50s and 60s due to their feature of lighting up). As already mentioned, it appeared in print ads in 1966 and then disappeared after 1973.

    Summary:
    It surprises me that there are not more of these clocks showing up on Etsy or Ebay. To me, it seems that they should be more abundant. Also I would think that they would be more desirable to collectors than other clocks. But that's where flip clockery didn't take that left turn at Albuquerque. People collect flip clocks for many varied reasons. Some collect clocks that have appeared on TV or in the movies (guilty here), others seek out specific brands (Panasonic, Sony) and still others just want the clock that they had as a kid.

    But as far as flip clock history, I feel the Caslon 201 earned it's spot as the trail blazer in the US market. Not only does it deserve a spot on the shelf of any collector of clocks just because of its historical significance, it's just simply, one nice little flip clock!

    Advertisement from 1967:

    (text of the above ad follows)



    Video of the Review and Disassembly of the 201
    The Copal Caslon Model 201 Images above courtesy of RedRiverAntiques Advertisements: References: 1. The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, California), 11 Dec 1966, Sun, Page 72 [view ad] 2. The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, California), 19 Sep 1967, Tue, Page 36 [view ad] 3. Pasadena Independent (Pasadena, California), 05 Jun 1968, Wed, Page 3 [view ad] 4. The Portsmouth Herald (Portsmouth, New Hampshire), 03 Nov 1969, Mon, Page 23 [view ad] 5. Chicago Tribune (Chicago, Illinois), 09 Sep 1969, Tue, Page 15 [view ad] 6. Lansing State Journal (Lansing, Michigan), 06 Jul 1969, Sun, Page 106 [view ad] 7. Arizona Republic (Phoenix, Arizona), 22 Sep 1970, Tue, Page 3 [view ad] 8. San Antonio Express (San Antonio, Texas), 23 Dec 1970, Wed, Page 7 [view ad] 9. Arizona Republic (Phoenix, Arizona)31 Aug 1971, Tue, Page 10 [view ad] 10. Arizona Daily Star (Tucson, Arizona), 09 Jan 1973, Tue, Page 30 [view ad] See forum entry to comment ...
    See more | Go to post

  • The Westclox Direct Reading Dialite

    The Westclox Direct Reading Dialite

    The Westclox Direct Reading Dialite - a quirkly little cyclometer from the late 60s. You'll find the Westclox Direct Reading Dialite on eBay from time to time, and it's sure to catch your eye with the hour spelled out but the minutes displayed in numerals. It really begs the question, why? Perhaps the designer just wanted to be different. Or maybe it was a psychological trick to confuse the brain and make time reading more difficult, for some unknown reason. Who knows. But it was just so different, here at FlipClockFans.com we had to take a closer look The clock is housed in basic plastic but boasting a brushed metal face. It's very similar to the Seth Thomas Speed Read. It is a rolling wheel or cyclometer clock with the obvious difference that the numbers are spelled out. Apparently, people in the day were not over enthusiastic other manufactures did not rush to make a similar model. But that's what makes them so interesting to collectors of early flip digital clocks. To be brutally honest, the feel of the clock in the hand is of cheapness (no offense to fans of this clock). That's just my first impression probably because the case is lightweight and thin plastic. Yet, the clock is a well made clock and this particular clock is running after some 50 years. Clock Details: Westclox Direct Reading Dialite Electric digital (rolling wheel) clock Features: Hour spelled out, minutes in bold numerals, seconds indicated in 5 second increments on rolling wheel in red. Bold numerals denote minutes and 5 second periods on lighted dial. The hour is spelled out. Woodgrain finish case with brushed gold face highlighted with gold edging. Manufacturer: Westclox Model Name: Direct Reading Dialite Model Number: S29C Westclox Catalog Number: 20222 Introduced: 1967 Discontinued: 1972 Initial Retail: $19.95 Case Material: Plastic Case Color: Simulated woodgrain Face Color: brushed gold color metal, gold border Details: Black numerals on white background, seconds red on white backgound, "Japan" located on 0 seconds. Dimensions (inches) Height:3 5/8 Width:7 3/8 Depth:3 3/8 Dial Illumination: Orange Neon Glow Bulb Please view the forum post to comment....
    See more | Go to post

  • The New Haven Time Flip Clock

    The New Haven Time Flip Clock

    The New Haven Time Flip Clock It was the 1930s - The era of the Great Depression, when the New Haven Clock Company produced an early version of a true flip clock - the New Haven "Time Flip," "Time at a Glance" clock. The New Haven Clock Company operated out of New Haven, Connecticut from 1853-1960. Over the more than one century of its existance, the well known clock company produced many varieties of table, wall and mantle clocks, including elaborate chime clocks, and later, even pocket watches. During the 1930s masters of the arts, architecture and design were consumed with the Art Deco style, and the New Haven Clock Company produced its share of plastic (Catalin and Bakelite) Art Deco time pieces. Yet, they continued to produce the elegant, traditional clocks of wood, glass and brass. The New Haven "Time Flip" fit somewhere between the these two categories. Now referred to as the "New Haven Flip Clock," in online circles today this antique wooden flip clock is often described as Art Deco. Perhaps it would be better to say that the New Haven Flip Clocks were, "influenced" by the Art deco movement. Because compared to true Art Deco, these clocks do not quite fit the bill. In fact, when they first came out between 1937-1939 Art Deco had evolved to what is now called the Streamline Moderne style. Everything from cars, clocks, and tools were designed with streamlined profiles, and produced with modern materials in keeping with the engineering advances in aviation and train design. The designers were in tune with the public's fascination with world travel and streamlined speed. The New Haven flip clocks, while clearly different and unique, were not exactly the prevailing style, and yet did not fit completely in the traditional form either. So perhaps this explains why these clocks did not quite catch on and quickly faded into obscurity. This apparent lack of popularity in their time, and likely limited production, probably explains the rarity of the New Haven Flip Clock, which today makes them highly collectable and sought after by both traditional clock collectors (horologists) and aficionados of flip clocks (horopalettologists). This current popularity and scarcity certainly accounts for the high prices the clocks command at traditional and online auctions. Truly A Clock Ahead of it's time After production of the New Haven Flip Clocks, 30 years would pass before the modern flip clock era began. Anyone who appreciates the clean lines and simplicity of the Cifra 3 and the elegant functionality of the early Copals will clearly see the connection to the New Haven Flip Clocks of the late 1930s. To more appreciate this link to the past we need a little historical background. History of early flip clocksRecorded information from the makers of antique clocks from the 1930s is scarce or non-existant. No one thought to keep records of the details beyond patents. Today, these details must be pieced together from old advertisements of the day, established horological journals and online sources. The limited recorded history results in many being surprised to learn that there were already "digital" clocks in the 1930s when the New Haven flip clocks came on the scene. These were the cyclometers, the clocks that had digits that rolled on relatively large wheels housed in necessarily bulky cabinets. These type of clocks continued on into the 40s, 50s and 60s until overtaken by the flip clocks. Due to this lack of readily available information, even people in the 1960s had little idea of the history of digital clocks. This can be seen by an advertisement from that period that describes a flip clock of the day as the first new way to tell time in 10 centuries. Ah well, that was a time before the internet and instant knowledge. So basically, what we know about the New Haven "Time Flip" remains limited. The consensus is that the clocks first appeared in 1937. And by 1939 an advertisement still describes the clock as "modern masterpiece by New Haven that gives you the time accurately and precisely, just like you would speak it." Two Versions of the New Haven Timepiece (Stylis and Perseus) There exist two distinct versions of the New Haven Flip Clock. The slightly larger and more common style we will refer to here as the "Stylis" - from the paper label typically found on the bottom reading "Stylis Timepiece." The clock mechanism of the Stylis is housed in a cylindrical glass tube which seems to rest on an equally sized wooden framework or cradle. The cylinder and cradle are positioned between two arched, wooden end pieces on either side, almost like bookends. The numerals are large compared to cyclometers of the time and are easily visible from many paces away. The color of the tiles may have been ivory originally and the numbers brown, but there is no known way at this time to determine if these colors have faded or changed over the years. The movement of the motor can be confirmed by a spinning flat circle, flush with the right inner side of the clock, that looks like an umbrella pattern. The whole assembly lies on a relatively short (about 1/2 inch), flat wooden base. The wood is reportedly "natural Mohogany, trimmed with White Holly". Advertisements list the dimensions as 7 3/4 inches wide, 3 3/4 inches high and 3 3/4 inches deep. The "style number" (or model number?) stamped into a silver blank space on the painted metal idenfication plate reads "N.H.S 611-247T". Painted on this plate one can also see the various patent numbers and the identification of the clock as from the New Haven Clock CO. New Haven, CT. U.S.A. The second version of the New Haven flip clock, considerably more rare, is more akin to our 60s-70s flip clocks. The bottom label of these clocks describes this as the "Perseus Numeral Timepiece." Yet the name plate on the backs of these clocks contains the same style number (N.H.S 611-247T) as found on the "Stylis Timepiece". As a side note, it must be mentioned here that there is also another varient with the name plate bearing the stamp "WS-611-437T" with the name "Westinghouse Elect. Supply Co, Hamilton St, New Hanven, Ct. USA". This clock also has the "Perseus Numeral Timepiece" label on the bottom. Collectors who have had both types in their possession assert that they are identical. It has been speculated that the New Haven Clock Company produced these alternately marked clocks to be destributed by Westinghouse...
    See more | Go to post
There are no articles in this category.
Working...
X