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Siemens MU 1600 Repair Suggestions

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  • Siemens MU 1600 Repair Suggestions

    Hey everyone, I'm new here, joined to try and find out about this clock. I managed to pick it up from a boot sale. It's not working unfortunately but I thought I might be able to tinker with it. It seems like Cyclometer clocks aren't really big here unfortunately, but perhaps someone might know a little about them?

    I've taken it out of its case and it all seems intact. Except for a little night light bulb which seems to be missing. Looks like someone has already been nosing around inside it.. Interestingly, I did try and power it on outside of the case and I get no sign of anything. However when I put it back inside the case and power on I can hear a faint hum.. I wonder why that would be? Could the timepiece not working be as simple as the nightlight missing? I.e. it not creating a circuit somewhere?

    Anyway, I've taken loads of photos of the inside but won't clutter up things here if I don't get any responses. If anyone knows a little about these thing I'd be really happy to hear about possible reasons for faults. And I'll happily post up all the mechanism photos. Either that or can suggest alternate avenues to find help? Any help much appreciated.

  • #2
    Hi Gizmo, one simple issue would be the lubricating grease in the motor has hardened, they sit for a long time and it can bind the shaft, you might hear a hum as the motor tries to turn but fails. There are various post on this forum about lubricating these old motors. Couple drops of oil onto the shaft so it feeds down into the motor might be enough. Carefully turn the motor by hand a bit, and see if you can free it up. Feel free to post some internal images.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the reply RetroFlip. Here's the internal photos. I've been reading about the motors in these types of clock. I'll definitely give your suggestion a try. My worry is that I won't be able to reach far enough into the shaft area. As you can see from the photos, it's quite wedged in there. I gather flip clocks usually have easier access to their motors. When I open it up again tomorrow though I'll give it a good check with this in mind. I'll post my results, fingers crossed! In the meantime if anyone has any further advice/ideas after seeing the internals, please do post.

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      • #4
        gizmo1990 - do the numbers flip easily, like when you try to set the time?
        ~ Mackey Site Administrator
        If you have any questions/comments Contact Me
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        • #5
          Hi
          Mackey Yes they flip very easily. Turning the dial in the opposite direction (which turns the alarm time dial) is a tad stiffer tho.

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          • #6
            A little update. I've inspected the motor more closely. I've given the yellow cog a few turns to turn the motor shaft. Turning it on just produces the same low buzzing noise though unfortunately. I can make out that the motor is by a manufacturer called Kundo? However, I can't see the voltage, just the end part 0v.

            I'm sourcing some clock oil next and will attempt to lubricate the shaft. If that doesn't work then I guess I'll have to take the frame apart to get at the motor. I've seen people use isopropyl to clean the motor. Would that work here? Or I've also see people apply heat to the motor to try and soften frozen parts/grease, is that an option?

            Thanks for the help guys.

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            • #7
              It's working!

              I gave the drive shaft a turn while power was applied and it started turning on its on. Brilliant, what a great feeling! I'm leaving it running and it's been keeping good time the past few hours. The alarm works fine too!

              I'm wondering whether I should give it a little maintenance now or leave it be? Perhaps still put some clock oil on the drive shaft? Or how about some on the nylon cogs too or grease?

              The night light bulb still needs replacing. I've ordered this one after seeing (I think Mackey's?) youtube video on replacing lights.

              https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Neon-Bulb...72.m2749.l2649

              It'll need a resistor but I'm not too sure what type. I'm a complete beginner at this, but I'm very much interested in learning. I've a multimeter on the way, would I be able to use that to discern what v the motor uses? I presume that's what the ebay description means by, "Suitable external series resistor for 110V is 33K and for 240V is 100K ¼W" Or would it mean the mains itself? In which case it would be 230v since I'm in Europe (UK).

              Any help much appreciated!

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              • #8
                Congrats! Personally, if the motor is working, I'd leave it alone. I'm not sure what the light connects into. If into the mains then you'll need the 100K 1/4 W resistor, like the following:
                http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm//220930116436


                I've got to increase your reputation to a "true flip clock fan."
                ~ Mackey Site Administrator
                If you have any questions/comments Contact Me
                If you're not a member, you should consider joining!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mackey View Post
                  Congrats! Personally, if the motor is working, I'd leave it alone. I'm not sure what the light connects into. If into the mains then you'll need the 100K 1/4 W resistor, like the following:
                  http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm//220930116436


                  I've got to increase your reputation to a "true flip clock fan."
                  Thanks Mackey! I'm checking out the eBay listing and msgd you.
                  Last edited by gizmo1990; 2 weeks ago. Reason: Didn't paste properly

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                  • #10
                    As. I sent to you in a message, I wondering if there's not already a resistor inside that blue sheath. Now that I see the bulb was broken, I understand why someone cut the leads from the back of the circuit board. If they weren't going to replace the bulb, that was a smart move.
                    ~ Mackey Site Administrator
                    If you have any questions/comments Contact Me
                    If you're not a member, you should consider joining!

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                    • #11
                      Update time! I detached the bulb tubing and.. I think the resistor has seen better days! I've already received the new bulbs and resistors so I just need to get hold of some shrink tubing before attempting the rebuild.

                      The clock itself is still running fine. I keep it going during the day but turn it off overnight. Unfortunately, it still needs a little nudge to start when turned on in the morning from cold. I'm wondering if this indicates the need to add a little clock oil to the motor shaft? What do you guys think? Obviously I'd rather the motor just work if turned on from being off, rather than have to open it up each time.

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                      • #12
                        Hmm, I wonder if this clock is using a capacitor to start the motor, kinda reminds me of a different electric motor issue where it was a ventilation fan and had a bad capacitor, you could hand start but would otherwise hum. Might be worth checking the board and seeing if you have any bad capacitors...

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                        • #13
                          RetroFlip Thanks for the advice. I can't see any fans on the board itself. Do you mean inside the motor itself? There doesn't seem to be anything on the board which I would presume are capacitors. There's that really huge resistor, could that in fact be an old style capacitor? Or the grey rectangular block, I've no idea what that is, could that be a capacitor?
                          Last edited by gizmo1990; 2 weeks ago.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by gizmo1990 View Post
                            RetroFlip Thanks for the advice. I can't see any fans on the board itself. Do you mean inside the motor itself? There doesn't seem to be anything on the board which I would presume are capacitors. There's that really huge resistor, could that in fact be an old style capacitor? Or the grey rectangular block, I've no idea what that is, could that be a capacitor?
                            Your clock not starting just reminded me of a electric motor issue I had in the past (It just happened to be in a fan, not clock) some electric motors use a start capacitor to get the motor moving, although I've never seen that in something small like a clock, I was just throwing it out there for your consideration. Having to open the case to hand start each time it looses power sounds like a pain...

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